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We're a good ways into 2016, and if you're wondering how your winter has been compared to last year's, the folks at EUMETSAT have you covered.

WATCH: Every storm on Earth in 2015, time lapsed


Daniel Martins
Digital Reporter

Wednesday, February 10, 2016, 9:44 AM - We're a good ways into 2016, and if you're wondering how your winter has been compared to last year's, the folks at EUMETSAT have you covered.

The European weather satellite information agency has released a time lapse video showing the progression of all of Earth's weather over the course of 2015, with running commentary from Mark Higgins, EUMETSAT's training manager.

Even on mute, it's mesmerizing to watch the most potent storms of last year pop in and out of existence, far removed from their real-world impact.

When the milder-than-normal Atlantic Hurricane season starts, watch at 6:30 as Hurricane Joaquin, the year's strongest at a peak rating of Category 4, affects the U.S. east coast, before its remnants zip in a moisture-laden mist across the Atlantic to impact the U.K., one of numerous systems to begin off North America and end in Europe.

Far more active is the Pacific. Once that season starts in earnest, watch the massive typhoons barrel across the Pacific, sometimes with several well-defined storms sharing the ocean at once. Zoom to the end of July to watch Category 5 Super Typhoon Soudelor form far out to sea, then track into the Far East for a direct hit on Taiwan.

In Canada, head over to the 2:15 mark and watch for a few seconds as Canada's snowline takes a big jump north from March into April, only hanging on in far northern areas by June. Skip ahead to the start of winter, it becomes quite apparent how late a start to the season it has been in some areas.

The video is stitched together using data from EUMETSAT, the U.S.' National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Japan Meteorological Agency.

WATCH: Amazing video of lighting storms from space

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