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After battering Bermuda with torrential rain and damaging winds, Hurricane Nicole is expected to create large swells and gale force winds in parts of Atlantic Canada, as the storm continues on its northeast track.

Nicole to deliver gale force winds, waves to Atlantic Canada


Digital writers
theweathernetwork.com

Saturday, October 15, 2016, 8:32 PM - After battering Bermuda with torrential rain and damaging winds, Hurricane Nicole is expected to create large swells and strong winds in parts of Atlantic Canada, as the storm continues on its northeast track.


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As of Saturday evening, Hurricane Nicole was continuing to move in an east-northeast direction in the Atlantic, with maximum sustained winds of 140 km/h.

Although the U.S. National Hurricane Center said the storm could become post-tropical either Friday night or Saturday, the agency's satellite data Saturday morning showed that Nicole had regained hurricane strength.


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"Swells from Nicole are affecting the coastline of Atlantic Canada and will continue through the remainder of the weekend," the National Hurricane Center said late Saturday. "These swells will create dangerous surf conditions and rip currents."

Environment Canada had issued its own tropical cyclone statement for the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland, but it was dropped altogether Saturday.

Ocean swells of 1 to 2 m can be expected along the south-facing coastlines of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland over the next couple of days, while gale-force winds are forecast over Laurentian Fan and the southern Grand Banks this weekend.

The storm is expected remain well offshore, but forecasters are keeping an eye on its movement.

Check back for updates as we continue to monitor the forecast.

Bermuda recovering after a direct hit from Nicole

Nicole made landfall in Bermuda Thursday as the strongest hurricane to strike the island since Fabian in 2003.

The eye of the massive storm crossed over the island around 11 a.m. local time. Heavy rain has dissipated, however, many schools and government offices remain closed Friday. Fortunately, no deaths have been reported.

The Causeway has sustained some damage and remains closed until an assessment by the Ministry of Public Works is carried out. Hurricane Nicole tore roofs off buildings, flooded homes and snapped many trees.


 FALL IS BACK: After a hot summer what can Canadians expect from fall? Find out with The Weather Network’s 2016 Fall Forecast | FORECAST & MAPS HERE


The storm formed more than a week ago on October 4. It made landfall in Bermuda at Category 3 status on Thursday, falling somewhat to a strong category 2 by the evening. The U.S. National Hurricane Center predicts weakening over the next couple of days. However, Nicole is expected to remain a powerful storm even though it could become a post-tropical cyclone on Saturday.

The Bermuda-based Bernews website reported more than 27,000 outages at the height of the storm, representing some 90 per cent of customers of the island's Belco utility.

Bermuda resident Vanessa Daniel told the Weather Network Thursday night that many trees and debris were blocking roads.

"There are reports of flooding, broken windows and some escaped pets," she said. "We just heard a loud bang and there was a flash of light. We think a nearby transformer blew. A reminder that it can be dangerous after the storm and that caution is required. As for our house, we lost a few limbs off our avocado tree, had some water leakage at our side door and the house shook before and after the eye, but no visible cracks. We will get on the roof in daylight to investigate."

The mid-Atlantic island has already experienced some tropical storm action this season. Back on September 23, 2016, Tropical Storm Karl passed just east of the archipelago with sustained winds of about 105 km/h, causing coastal erosion and flooding in several areas.

Nicole's intensification marked the first time since 1964 that two hurricanes (Matthew and Nicole) at or above Category 2 existed in the western Atlantic Ocean (65°W) simultaneously.


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