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A recent study found a correlation between rising temperatures and an increase in cases of diabetes in the U.S.
HEALTH AND CLIMATE

Global warming could be linked to rise in diabetes cases


Wednesday, March 22, 2017, 3:46 - A recent study found a correlation between rising temperatures and an increase in cases of diabetes in the U.S.

Researchers from Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands published the study in the journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care on Monday. 

The study examined data from type 2 diabetes cases in the U.S. between 1996 to 2009. It concluded that as the average annual temperature rose by 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degree Fahrenheit), the number of diabetes cases rose by 3.1 per 10,000 people. 

Researchers suspect the rise could be due to the inactivity of brown adipose tissue, a natural body fat that produces heat by burning fat stored in organs to keep the body warm when temperatures drop.


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If temperatures stay warm, the inactivity of brown adipose tissue can increase fat stored in organs, causing glucose intolerance and diabetes. 

According to the World Health Organization, about 422 million people worldwide suffer from either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one out of every three Americans will develop Type 2 diabetes.

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