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As a ridge of high pressure brings glorious late summer conditions to kick off the first week of fall in Ontario, forecasters are keeping a close eye on the potential impact Hurricane Matthew could have on the long weekend forecast.

Hurricane Matthew's track could impact Ontario's weekend


Andrea Bagley
Digital Reporter

Tuesday, October 4, 2016, 10:19 AM - As a ridge of high pressure brings glorious late summer conditions to kick off the first week of fall in Ontario, forecasters are keeping a close eye on the potential impact Hurricane Matthew could have on the long weekend forecast. 


FALL IS BACK: After a hot summer what can Canadians expect from fall? Find out with The Weather Network’s 2016 Fall Forecast | FORECAST & MAPS HERE


"We're currently experiencing the finest weather that fall has to offer for much of eastern Canada with above seasonal temperatures," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham. "We'll see widespread daytime highs in the low to mid 20s from southern Ontario to the Maritimes this week."

Humidex values also creep back into the forecast with some places feeling like 30 later this week.

Eyes on Hurricane Matthew

A low pressure system from the central U.S. will track along the boundary between the well below seasonal air that's bringing snow to the Prairies and the late summer warmth in southern Ontario.

"This low will track into northern Ontario with a period of wind and rain," Gillham says. "A cold front (with a period of rain showers) crosses southern Ontario Friday night/Saturday with the timing influenced by where Hurricane Matthew is in the pattern."

Some computer models bring this front through with nothing more than isolated showers, however, if Matthew is taking a track closer to the coast of the Northeast U.S., then tropical moisture will get drawn in along the front with a more substantial period of rain.

"A strong storm near the coast would result in a stronger northerly flow across the Great Lakes with colder temperatures and lake effect precipitation," Gillham says.

Check back for updates, as we continue to monitor the forecast. 

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