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Scattered showers and isolated thunderstorms will continue through the first weekend of July as cooler air from Canada driven by a low pressure center moves into the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes region. This unstable pattern, could very well continue early next week affecting some areas of the region into the Northeast during Independence Day.
STORM WATCH | Fourth of July

Storms target Midwest, Northeast through Fourth of July


Staff Writers

Monday, July 3, 2017, 2:03 - With the Fourth of July long weekend underway, the weather is on the minds of many at the moment. And as active weather continues in the east and heat builds in the west, it's with good reason.

See what the remainder of the holiday long weekend has in store for you as we take a look at the weather nation-wide.

A slow-moving pattern is set to remain more or less in place into the next week, meaning more unsettled weather through parts of the Midwest and Northeast, as cooler air from Canada dips into the region on the heels of a low pressure system.


STORM TOOL KIT: Be prepared for severe weather with The Weather Network's online essentials: ALERTS | LIVE RADAR | UPLOAD PHOTOS/VIDEOS | LATEST NEWS | FOLLOW ON TWITTER | HIGHWAY FORECAST | AIRPORT FORECAST


For Monday afternoon, a great deal of the country is in for a chance of storms, but it is in the Plains where the risk for storms turning severe will be highest.

The Storm Prediction Center identifies an area centered on Oklahoma as carrying the chance for the most severe storms Monday.


STORM TOOL KIT: Be prepared for severe weather with The Weather Network's online essentials: ALERTS | LIVE RADAR | UPLOAD PHOTOS/VIDEOS | LATEST NEWS | FOLLOW ON TWITTER | HIGHWAY FORECAST | AIRPORT FORECAST


"Widely scattered severe thunderstorms are expected across portions of the central and southern Plains, especially over portions of southern Kansas into Oklahoma," the SPC says. "Isolated marginally severe storms are possible across the Ohio Valley into the northern Middle Atlantic, from Arkansas into Middle Tennessee, and over parts of the Carolinas."

The SPC adds that, for the most at-risk zone in Oklahoma and some of surrounding states, the main risks will be large hail and damaging winds.

Looking ahead to July Fourth itself, Tuesday lacks the more elevated risk for more severe thunderstorms, though that doesn't mean the skies will be clear.

"Isolated to scattered thunderstorms, some which could be accompanied by strong wind gusts and hail, will be possible on Tuesday afternoon into early evening in the central and northern Great Plains, portions of the Southern Plains eastward to the Mid-South, and in the southern Appalachians," the Center says.

Weather warnings will be updated on the ALERTS page of our website.

Source: Climate Prediction Center | National Weather Service

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