Your weather when it really mattersTM

Country

Please choose your default site

Americas

Asia

Europe

News
Severe storms move out of Texas leaving behind a trail of death and destruction.

Deadly historic floods devastate Texas, with more rain ahead


Dalia Ibrahim
Digital Reporter

Thursday, May 28, 2015, 5:42 - Floodwaters are starting to recede in Texas, where the number of dead and missing is rising.


RELATED: Dramatic photos show extent of flooding in Texas


THE DEVASTATION

Authorities said a third body was pulled from the Blanco River that crested three times above flood stage during relentless storms in Central Texas. That brings to 13 the number of people killed by the holiday weekend storms in Texas. 

The Blanco River had a record flood that registered more than 40 feet before the gauge became inoperable. 

"In 1929, we had a 33.5 foot surge come through. That was the highest on record," Wimberley Mayor Steve Thurber told CNN. "This one topped out at 44.5 feet before we lost communications with the gauge."

Earlier Tuesday 13 people were reported missing in Hays County, but two of those were found safe, bringing the number down to 11, authorities said. That includes eight people who were in a vacation home that was swept away and slammed into a bridge downstream. Two 6-year-olds and a 4-year-old were among those inside. They have been missing since early Sunday morning, the Associated Press reported.

CLICK BELOW TO WATCH: Father-in-law of missing Texas family explains how family got scattered 

In Houston, at least five people died, and two were still missing as of Wednesday morning, according to CNN. 

More than 11 inches of rain fell in less than 24-hours in parts of the city Monday, on top of relentless rainfall that had already inundated the city over the weekend. 

Major interstates turned to rivers, as water quickly inundated the country's fourth largest city. At least 2,500 vehicles were abandoned by drivers seeking higher ground, officials said. 

Officials believe about 4,000 homes were severely damaged. 

CLICK BELOW TO WATCH: Severe storms move out of Texas leaving behind a trail of death and destruction

In Oklahoma, six people died from the storm that began over the Memorial Day weekend. They included a firefighter in Claremore who was trying to perform a water rescue. 

At least 13 people died when a tornado spawned by the same storm system struck northern Mexico on Monday. 

OFFICIALS SAY STORMS UNPRECEDENTED IN SCOPE, INTENSITY 

Weather forecasters say Memorial Day weekend storms that dumped rain across two-thirds of Texas were epic not only in the area affected but in the intensity they maintained.

The storms that formed from the Texas Panhandle to the Edwards Plateau on Saturday unleashed what was, in some places, record flooding when it met rich Gulf moisture, said National Weather Service emergency response specialist and meteorologist Kurt Van Speybroeck in an interview with the Associated Press.


RELATED: Powerful tornado kills at least 14 people in Mexico


The Blanco River had a record flood that registered more than 40 feet before the gauge became inoperable. Flooding along the Red River and its tributaries was the worst for that basin since at least 2007 and perhaps since the mid-1980s. 

The flooding in the Houston area was the worst since Tropical Storm Allison in 2001.

NEW THUNDERSTORMS HIT WATERLOGGED HOUSTON 

A new line of thunderstorms was snarling traffic in the flood-weary Houston area early Wednesday morning, however they didn't appear to be exacerbating the problems in parts of the flood-battered city, officials said. 

Harris County Judge Ed Emmett said the good news Wednesday was that the heavy rainfall remained in a different area of the region than those most affected on Tuesday.

Wednesday severe weather risk (SPC)

But county officials say additional rainfall could lead to problems on bayous, creeks and rivers. 

Some scattered spots on service roads along Interstate 45 north of Houston were flooded but main lanes were moving, the Associated Press reported. 

About 2.5 inches of rain were recorded in north and northwest Harris County Wednesday with a line of storms that began just before dawn. More than double that amount has been reported in more rural counties northwest of Houston.

CLICK BELOW TO WATCH: Man kayaks through flood in Houston Tuesday morning

Source: The Weather Channel | The Associated Press | CNN KHOU-TV  | NBC News | 

Weather Network digital reporter Katie Jones contributed to this article

Wet, stormy Memorial Day weekend ahead for Southern Plains
Severe storms cause damage, flooding in Texas and Oklahoma
Four horrible things people did to survive the wilderness
Default saved
Close

Search Location

Close

Sign In

Please sign in to use this feature.