Country

Please choose your default site

Americas

Asia

Europe

News
What to expect over the next 36 hours.
SEVERE WEATHER | Tornado, hail and damaging wind risk

Severe storms, with tornadoes, possible along Great Lakes


Staff Writers

Thursday, April 20, 2017, 11:47 - After slamming parts of the central Plains and Midwest Wednesday, a potent storm system will track eastward into the Great Lakes region, bringing the risk for large hail, damaging winds and isolated tornadoes. The Storm Prediction Center has highlighted an Enhanced and Slight Risk area, covering parts of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania and western New York. The threat of potentially severe weather will extend southwest later Thursday evening into the southern Plains, with a slight risk of severe storms expected in both the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma.  Here's what you need to know.


STORM TOOL KIT: Be prepared for severe weather with The Weather Network's online essentials: ALERTS | LIVE RADAR | UPLOAD PHOTOS/VIDEOS | LATEST NEWS | FOLLOW ON TWITTER | HIGHWAY FORECAST | AIRPORT FORECAST


THURSDAY: Enhanced risk of severe weather for the Great Lakes region

It's not often we see an Enhanced Risk of severe weather, with a 5% risk of tornadoes in Michigan, but that's the case Thursday. 

"Severe storms capable of producing damaging winds, hail, and perhaps a tornado or two will be possible across parts of the southern Great Lakes region and Ohio Valley this afternoon and early evening," says the Storm Prediction Center (SPC) in a weather bulletin Thursday morning.

The storms are a result of an upstream upper trough over the Upper Midwest, which will continue eastward toward the Upper Great Lakes by this evening. A surface low over eastern Iowa early this morning may somewhat deepen as the warm front spreads slowly northward across southern Lower Michigan and the Lake Erie vicinity, according to the SPC.

Click play to watch below: Storm Track and Timing


Tornado 101: Everything you need to know about staying safe



STORM TOOL KIT: Be prepared for severe weather with The Weather Network's online essentials: ALERTS | LIVE RADAR | UPLOAD PHOTOS/VIDEOS | LATEST NEWS | FOLLOW ON TWITTER | HIGHWAY FORECAST | AIRPORT FORECAST


By early afternoon, storm cells are expected to break out across parts of Indiana and Michigan, along and ahead of the advancing cold front. Given the wind profile, these cells will likely organize into a squall line, which will track east through the afternoon and evening.

In addition to hail, damaging winds and isolated tornadoes, these storms may produce heavy downpours which could lead to localized flooding. Anywhere between an inch to 1.5 inch of rainfall will be possible in the Enhanced and Slight risk areas as outlined on the map above. 

Below: Rainfall forecast through Friday (Courtesy: National Weather Service)

"We have an abundance of direction and speed wind shear in the atmosphere," explains Weather Network meteorologist Jaclyn Whittal. "This means storms that will be discrete and isolated have the potential to become rotational." 

By the end of the day, the squall line will extend into the southern Plains. Isolated severe storms capable of producing large hail will also possible across parts of the region, with the greatest threat being in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles.


Tornado 101: Everything you need to know about staying safe


In areas where there's cooler air, there will be potential for some snow. Parts of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and northern Wisconsin are at the greatest risk for accumulating snow Thursday as storms track eastward.

Friday: There is a slight risk of severe thunderstorms for central and eastern Oklahoma into north-central Texas and western Arkansas

Severe storms are expected from the southern Great Plains to the Tennessee Valley Friday into Friday night, with the greatest concentration of severe weather likely across parts of Oklahoma, far north Texas, and western Arkansas. Large hail, damaging winds, and perhaps a couple tornadoes will be possible.

Areas to keep a close eye on: Oklahoma City, OK...Norman, OK...Lawton, OK...Broken Arrow, OK...Fort Smith, AR.

Saturday: Storms continue through the weekend across the South

Isolated to scattered severe thunderstorms are possible over the lower Mississippi Valley on Saturday with isolated strong to severe thunderstorms possible over parts of the Tennessee Valley and into North Carolina.

"The strongest 500-mb west-southwesterly flow and substantial height falls are forecast across the lower Mississippi Valley with effective shear supportive of organized thunderstorms capable of isolated to scattered hail/wind damage with the stronger storms," says the SPC.

Long Range Probabilities

  • Severe weather for parts of the southern Great Plains, Fri, Apr 21. 
  • High winds for parts of New Mexico and west Texas, Fri, Apr 21. 
  • Heavy rain shifting east from the central and southern Great Plains to the middle Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee Valleys, Fri-Sat, Apr 21-22. 
  • Heavy rain for parts of the central Appalachians, mid-Atlantic, and Northeast, Sun-Mon, Apr 23-24.

Watch below: Potential storm track:

Be sure to check back for updates as we monitor this developing system.

Watch Below: Long Range Forecast

California's Northern Sierra breaks record for wettest year
'Food source' for potential life found on Saturn's moon
Default saved
Close

Search Location

Close

Sign In

Please sign in to use this feature.