Your weather when it really mattersTM

Country

Please choose your default site

Americas

Asia

Europe

News

Mist of Niagara frozen in time, best shots of frosty falls


Leeanna McLean
Digital Reporter

Monday, January 8, 2018, 14:00 - Niagara Falls has transformed into a crystal palace and tourists from all over the world are flocking to the city to see the icy spectacle.

While it may appear that sections of the falls have frozen over, the natural wonder rarely freezes over completely. At the base of the waterfall, ice gathers and builds into what some call an "ice bridge."

Niagara Falls is a force of nature, and despite the fact that we've seen record cold temperatures this winter across the Great Lakes, the falls have not frozen over. The Weather Network meteorologist Nadine Hinds-Powell explains why below.

"A couple of factors tie into this. Anyone who has ever visited the falls is amazed at it's shear power. It's that power that keeps it flowing, even in the coldest of temperatures," says Hinds-Powell.

SHARE YOUR WEATHER: Upload your photos and videos for a chance to be featured on TheWeatherNetwork.com.

"During the winter, about 85 million litres (22.4 million gallons) of water flow over the falls, rushing at a rate of up to 40 km/h (25 mph), according to Niagara Parks. Along the edges of the falls and in shallower sections, the surface of the water might freeze as it's not as turbulent, allowing for the water to respond to the frigid air for ice to form. The heavy amount of mist that is generated as the water rushes over the falls can freeze on contact with the rocky outcrops on the edge of the gorge."

Nevertheless, it is still a magical sight to see. 




Fire and ice

A post shared by Kael Rebick (@punkodelish) on






WATCH BELOW: Chicago fire escape gets wintry makeover after sprinkler mishap




Homeless shelters overwhelmed in brutal cold outbreak
Ice volcanoes and -96 cold: frozen oddities in the Northeast
Warmer but stormy: rain, snow, blizzards and ice this week
Frozen iguanas, sluggish turtles: Animals feel the chill
Default saved
Close

Search Location

Close

Sign In

Please sign in to use this feature.