Your weather when it really mattersTM

Country

Please choose your default site

Americas

Asia

Europe

News
Eclipse 2015 as it happened

UK Solar Eclipse 2015 Live - as it happened


Find Your Forecast

    Friday, March 20, 2015, 11:14 -

    Here's our live blog from earlier today. See our current article and videos about the UK solar eclipse 2015


    11:15
    That's it from us! If you took any shots of Eclipse 2015, we would love to see them. Upload to our online photo gallery here.


    11:10
    It was disappointingly cloudy across south-east England and parts of the north-west, but for may there was some decent eclipse viewing to be had.


    11:05


    11:00
    Skies remained overcast across London and the southeast as the moon made its last contact with the sun and Eclipse 2015 came to an end.


    10:55
    The total eclipse as seen from space by ESA's Proba-2


    10:50
    Only birds and planes would have had a decent view of the eclipse in SE England with all that cloud


    10:45
    Amazing diamond ring of shot from Svalbard as totality came to an end.


    10:40
    For people in London and SE England, this was the best view of Eclipse 2015 they got


    10:35
    Pictures of the eclipse from Newcastle-upon-Tyne


    10:30
    Stunning pictures from Svalbard as the solar eclipse reached its peak.


    10:25
    Helen Young's frustration at the cloud cover in London


    10:22
    Noticeable changes in light as solar eclipse wanes in London


    10:20
    Helen Young speaks to an eclipse watcher at the Royal Greenwich Observatory about what it was like during the maximum eclipse


    10:18
    Take any shots of the eclipse? We'd love to see them so why not upload them to our online photo gallery here.


    10:15
    Svalbard is the next and last place to total eclipse will reach on land and skies are looking clear.


    10:05
    Some brief breaks in the cloud across south-eastern parts of Northern Ireland allowed for decent eclipse viewing.


    10:00
    Helen Young at the Royal Greenwich Observatory during the peak eclipse


    09:55
    Satellite picture from 09:40 clearly showing the moon's shadow across NW Europe at the peak of the eclipse. From: Sat24


    09:50
    Stunning image of the total eclipse from the BBC's stargazing plane


    09:46
    It's turned dark across the Faroe Islands as totality begins.


    09:45
    Airspace near to Faroe Islands crowded as flight tours aim to see the total eclipse


    09:40
    Offices empty in Central London as day turns to dusk despite the cloudy skies.


    09:35
    Great pic from Fife, Scotland as eclipse peaks


    09:25
    Clouds gather for the peak eclipse in London despite the cloudy skies.


    09:20
    Peak eclipse time is nearly here in the UK. Just 10-20mins to go depending where you are.


    09:16
    This is what you would be seeing in the capital if it wasn't overcast!


    09:15
    The sun is over 50% covered by the moon now.


    09:10
    Best eclipse viewing conditions are across SW England, Wales, the Midlands, and parts of NE England and E Scotland. Disappointingly cloudy elsewhere.. Pic:Sat24.com


    09:05
    Only around 20mins to go until the peak of the eclipse! Exact times depend on your location in the UK.


    09:00
    Eclipse shadow begins to engulf western Europe. First pic from 08:15, the next 08:45 showing the darkening skies to the west.


    08:55
    Eclipse begins in London under cloudy skies


    08:48
    Cloud breaks across eastern Scotland allowing for a good view of the eclipse from Fife.


    08:45
    View from Sherwood Observatory near Nottingham.


    08:40
    The moon has now taken a large 'bite' out of the sun!


    08:35
    The eclipse has already started, but here are the peak times for the eclipse. Between 09:25 and 09:45.


    08:30
    First images of the eclipse are coming in from SW England


    08:25
    The moon will be starting to cover up the sun from around now. Here's Chris with the cloud cover forecast this morning.


    08:20
    Astronomer Tom Kerrs tells us what we can expect to see during this morning's eclipse (weather permitting!)


    08:10
    Helen Young is at the Royal Observatory Greenwich hoping the cloud will clear in time for the eclipse within the next hour.


    08:00
    People across the UK are preparing to see the partial solar eclipse. There's clear skies for some, but it's overcast for others...


    07:50
    Here's the latest cloud forecast for 9am. Hopefully the cloud in SE England and E Anglia will thin and break in places but some will stay overcast. Best chance of clear skies across SW England, Wales and the Midlands. Clear spells too for NE England and E Scotland.


    07:40
    If you're hoping to watch the eclipse, make sure you stay safe! NEVER LOOK AT THE SUN directly. Use specially designed solar glasses, a pin-hole projector or even a colander! 


    07:30
    Our News Editor Jamil and meteorologist Helen Young are at The Greenwich Observatory this morning, but unfortunately its looking overcast and murky at the moment. Hopefully some cloud breaks for the London area later this morning.


    07:20
    Wondering how solar eclipses occur? Here's our handy explainer!

    Source:Wikicommons

    Source:Wikicommons


    07:10
    Wondering how big the eclipse will be where you live? Weather permitting, over 98% across the Western Isles to around 85% in London and SE England.


    07:00
    First visible satellite pictures show the extent of the cloud across the UK. Clearest skies are across SW England, Wales and the Midlands with some breaks across NE England and E Scotland too. A lot of cloud across SE England and across the N Ireland and W Scotland. (Pic: Sat24.com)


    06:45:
    Morning! It's Friday. It's eclipse day. Excited? Tweet us your thoughts, pictures…and if you can muster it this early in the morning, send us your #eclipseface. See a previous attempt by Chris and Richard below. 


    Thursday
    Check our latest eclipse day weather forecast to see if the weather could hamper your viewing tomorrow.

    Even if the weather doesn’t playing ball, it’s not all doom and gloom. The eclipse lasts for a few hours so plenty of opportunity to get a few breaks in the cloud and it can still viewable in light cloud.

    Here are some expert tips on the best way to view the eclipse from a Royal Observatory Greenwich astronomer and a bit of history on the phenomenal spectacle.

    Helen Young and Jamil Hussein will be reporting from the Observatory for us in the morning.

    The excitement is definitely palpable for the supermoon, solar eclipse, spring equinox extravaganza. We’ll see you here tomorrow!

    Leave a Comment

    What do you think? Join the conversation.
    Default saved
    Close

    Search Location

    Close

    Sign In

    Please sign in to use this feature.