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Royal Observatory Greenwich Astronomer Tom Kerss gives us some history on the eclipse and tips on watching it

UK solar eclipse 2015: The best way to watch the eclipse – expert view


Wednesday, March 18, 2015, 09:00 GMT -

We went to the Royal Observatory Greenwich to speak to astronomer Tom Kerss about the eclipse on Friday.
Tom gives tips on how to view the eclipse, why it’s worth watching even if the weather is bad and his best eclipse fact.

What’s the best way to view the eclipse?

The sun will be rising in the east for us in the UK. So make sure the place you’re going to view the eclipse has a clear east and southeast horizon.

You cannot look directly at the Sun – that could lead to temporary or permanent eye damage. Look through special eclipse glasses or observe the shadow of the eclipse, looking away from the sun. You can use a card with hole in it or even a colander to project the shadow of the eclipse. Find out more details.

What if the weather is bad?

If the sun is covered completely by the clouds you won’t see anything. But remember it’s a long event – about two hours – so there may be a break in the clouds. And if the clouds are light, you may still be able to make out the crescent shape of the eclipse.


 RELATED: UK Solar Eclipse 2015 Weather Forecast


So it’s still worth viewing?

An eclipse is an awesome, natural spectacle to see whatever the weather. It happens rarely; the last time we saw an eclipse close to this was in 1999. The next total eclipse in Europe is in 2026. So this spectacle is worth looking at – to see the sun, moon and the earth in motion together. 

Any interesting eclipse facts?

In 1919, English scientist Arthur Eddington, who worked at the Observatory, proved Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity was true by observing an eclipse.


 RELATED: Solar Eclipse 2015: Myths and Legends


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