Your weather when it really mattersTM

Country

Please choose your default site

Americas

Asia

Europe

News
Take a look at some of the amazing photos from this year's Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2015.

Solar eclipse image wins astronomy photo award


Friday, September 18, 2015, 16:14 GMT -

French photographer Luc Jamet beat over a thousand amateur and professional photographers from around the globe to win the title of Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2015. 

Judges said they were enthralled by Jamet’s image capturing the drama of the total solar eclipse of 20th March 2015, 100m above the wintry valley of Sassendalen in the Norwegian territory of Svalbard.

Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year is run by the Royal Observatory Greenwich in association with Insight Investment and BBC Sky at Night Magazine.


Winning photo: Total eclipse photo competition © Luc Jamet

Winning photo: Total eclipse photo competition © Luc Jamet

The UK’s Matt Robinson was runner-up to Luc in the Skyscapes category with his photo of a noctilucent cloud display in Sunderland. 

“I took the image because it was absolutely beautiful and a wonderful display… better than any Northern Lights display I’ve seen,” said Matt to The Weather Network UK. 

“The competition came up on my news feed and I just entered – now I’m standing here as one of the runners up in the competition, so I’m still stunned about it," he added.

Skyscapes runner-up: Sunderland Noctilucent Cloud Display © Matt Robinson

Skyscapes runner-up: Sunderland Noctilucent Cloud Display © Matt Robinson

Check out the other winning photos from the various categories.

Luc Jamet beat over a thousand amateur and professional photographers from around the globe to win the award. Here's...

Posted by The Weather Network on Friday, 18 September 2015

BBC Sky at Night Magazine’s Editor Chris Bramley, one of the judges for the competition, said of this year’s contest: “The quality of this year’s field of over 2,700 images from across the globe meant that there was some lively debate over the judging. Each and every category contained images of a jaw-dropping standard.”

The best photographs – winners, runners-up or highly commended in the different categories – are showcased in a free exhibition in the Royal Observatory’s Astronomy Centre from 18 September 2015 until 26 June 2016. 

Follow Jamil Hussein on ,
WATCH: Massive fireballs streak across Hawaiian skies
Rare red lightning photographed from space
International Astronomy Day: Stargazing top tips

Leave a Comment

What do you think? Join the conversation.
Default saved
Close

Search Location

Close

Sign In

Please sign in to use this feature.