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Spring allergies

Win the battle against allergies this spring

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    Saturday, March 22, 2014, 4:08 PM -

    Whether warm temperatures greet you this spring or you have a chill in the air - allergy season is fast approaching. We have some tips on how allergy sufferers can manage this time of year.


    SUFFER WITH ALLERGIES?: Check today's local and national allergy forecast here.


    Springtime may bring beautiful flowers, green grass, and budding trees, but for allergy suffers it can mean weeks of feeling lousy from the pollen. If you suffer with mild to moderate symptoms, specialists say allergy medicine may help.

    "If you're suffering from runny nose, sneezing and itchy eyes I will recommend an antihistamine med for your symptoms," says Dr. Erinn Gardner. "But if nasal congestion is an issue then it's a decongestant that may be more helpful." 


    SEE ALSO: Is climate change causing a spike in asthma and allergies?


    And if you think ahead and start these meds before you even experience symptoms, you may keep them away or reduce their severity. 

    When these efforts don't seem to be helping it may be time for allergy shots. 


    HEALING NATURE: Study suggests a link between trees and human health


    "Allergy shots are nice in that they help you build an immunity to the things you're allergic to, so that over time, we see a decrease in symptoms," adds Dr. Gardner. 

    It can also help to keep the windows closed and the AC on to reduce your exposure to the pollen. Another tip, take a shower when you get in if you've been outdoors for a while. This will wash away excess pollen. 

    It's important to remember that adults can develop allergies even if they had none as children.

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