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An invasive species is banding together to survive severe flooding in South Carolina.

See invasive species create raft after South Carolina floods


Leeanna McLean
Digital Reporter

Wednesday, October 7, 2015, 1:28 PM - An invasive species is banding together to survive severe flooding in South Carolina.

Torrential downpours have killed at least 17 people, hundreds of roads are still closed and more than 400,000 residents in South Carolina remain under a boil water advisory. 

However, it seems fire ants are prevailing against what state officials are calling a 1,000-year storm.

Notorious for their painful bites, fire ants have the ability to link legs and create a raft out of their bodies.

Bands of these insects have been spotted braving floodwaters across South Carolina.

A colony of fire ants can build a raft in less than two minutes and can survive for weeks, provided they eventually reach land, according to National Geographic.

"The ants move their queen and larvae to the center of the raft, where they stay high and dry on top of the mass of bodies. The fine coat of hairs on the ants traps enough air that those on the bottom layer of the raft avoid being completely submerged," National Geographic reports.

The invasive species are indigenous to swamp lands in Brazil, which flood on a regular basis.

Source: National Geographic

Related video: Storm Hunters - That's a wrap on South Carolina

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