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The reality of the historic rains along the U.S. coast are being realized through new video.

Satellite sees beautiful colours emerge after storm


Cheryl Santa Maria
Digital Reporter

Friday, October 30, 2015, 6:57 PM - A 1,000-year storm hit South Carolina earlier this month, causing widespread flooding, 11 deaths in the state and billions of dollars in damages.

The incredible amount of rain was courtesy of a convergence of systems that funneled steady, intense rainfall into South Carolina for several days.

Meteorologists called it a thousand-year flood event, meaning there would be a 0.1 per cent chance of it happening in any given year.

Now, new satellite imagery has been released showing the sediment the storm stirred up.

The NASA satellite image, taken on October 15, shows a striking array of blues circling around the coast.


Courtesy: NASA


"Damaging heavy rains fell on South Carolina in the southeastern United States at the beginning of October 2015," NASA says on its website.

"Much of that water had, by mid-October, flowed into the Atlantic Ocean bringing with it heavy loads of sediment, nutrients, and dissolved organic material. The above image, from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite, shows the runoff as it interacts with ocean currents."

Clean-up efforts remain underway in South Carolina.

Officials say it will be months before the state fully recovers.

Source: NASA

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