Expired News - The real reason behind all the green at the Opening Ceremony - The Weather Network
Your weather when it really mattersTM

Country

Please choose your default site

Americas

Asia - Pacific

Europe

News

Green fireworks, green Olympic rings, green spotlights, and, of course, Brazil's green flag. Green was the theme at the Rio 2016 Opening Ceremony on Aug. 5, but the reason wasn't as clear-cut as it seemed.

The real reason behind all the green at the Opening Ceremony


Daksha Rangan
Digital Reporter

Saturday, August 6, 2016, 7:56 PM - Green fireworks, green Olympic rings, green spotlights, and, of course, Brazil's green flag.

Green was the theme at the Rio 2016 Opening Ceremony on Aug. 5, but the reason wasn't entirely as clear-cut as it seemed.

Despite the historic and cultural aspects of the Opening Ceremony, use of the colour green, some suggest, goes beyond the Brazilian flag. It was a symbol of the environment, omnipresent throughout the ceremony.


NOW ON YOUTUBE: Subscribe to The Weather Network's YouTube channel for access to the best weather-related videos in Canada VIEW THE CHANNEL | VIEWER VIDEOS | POPULAR NOW | SUBSCRIBE


As more than 3 billion people around the world tuned in to watch one of the most widely-celebrated sporting events kick-off, they were also watching a video on the state of climate change.

"The heat is melting the ice cap," a voice narrated. "It’s disappearing very quickly."

The graphic below, made by climate scientist Ed Hawkins of the National Center for Atmospheric Science, was featured during the ceremony, Mashable reports.

via GIPHY

The animation contrasts average surface temperatures rising with pre-industrial average temperatures, the publication notes.

Additionally, the traditional Olympic rings were comprised of sprouting seed boxes. All 11,000 athletes reportedly received tree seeds and soil cartridges to be planted in one of Rio's parks.

Rio 2016 #OpeningCeremony

A video posted by Bruno Trindade (@brunotrindade_) on

Leading up to the ceremony, Brazil was under scrutiny for a number of reasons -- namely, the state of their waters, along with the plight of the Amazon rainforest.

In 2015, an area in the Brazilian Amazon more than seven times the size of New York City was completely clear-cut, The Guardian reports.

<i>Deforestation in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.</i>

Deforestation in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

WATCH BELOW: Raw sewage and 'super bacteria' lurking under Rio's waters

SOURCE: The Huffington Post | Mashable  | The Guardian

Default saved
Close

Search Location

Close

Sign In

Please sign in to use this feature.