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ONTARIO PATTERN

Ontario: Last blast of EXTREME heat for July, storm threat


Digital writers
theweathernetwork.com

Monday, July 16, 2018, 2:10 PM - As we pass the halfway mark of July, a big pattern change will end the month on a much more comfortable note in southern Ontario, even BELOW seasonal at points. It's still one more STICKY day however, with heat warnings in place and a widespread thunderstorm threat for Monday. More on the current heat warnings and timing of the stormy conditions, below.


WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Widespread heat across the region with temperatures at or above 30°C and humidex values near 40 Monday
  • Instability and high available moisture will enhance the risk of thunderstorms that could bring downpours Monday
  • Cooler weather with less heat and humidity is expected to dominate late July and into August

WATCH BELOW: ROUGH TIMING FOR MONDAY'S STORMS



HEAT WARNINGS AHEAD OF COMFORTABLE COOL DOWN

Heat warnings remain in place across parts of the region on Monday as a hot and humid airmass lingers. For some, it was already feeling like 30 with the humidity during the early morning hours of the new work week. 

"Watch for the effects of heat illness: swelling, rash, cramps, fainting, heat exhaustion, heat stroke and the worsening of some health conditions," warns Environment Canada. "Drink plenty of water even before you feel thirsty and stay in a cool place. Check on older family, friends and neighbours. Make sure they are cool and drinking water."

You'll also want to reduce the heat risk by scheduling outdoor activities during the coolest parts of the day. 

STORM THREAT, TORRENTIAL DOWNPOURS

Monday's storm threat will impact outdoor activities through parts of the day as well as a cold front moves through and conflicts with the simmering heat. Environment Canada issued severe thunderstorm watches for several areas before the lunch hour Monday, including all of the Greater Toronto Area. Some were upgraded to severe thunderstorm warnings as storms fired up through the late morning and early afternoon.



"Conditions are favourable for the development of severe thunderstorms that may be capable of producing strong wind gusts, large hail and heavy rain," EC warns. 

While storms are expected to remain patchy in nature, it's the widespread and beneficial rain we've been waiting for. We are also looking at the potential for strong storms and torrential rains in a short period of time for places that do see activity.

A QUICK 10 DEGREE TEMPERATURE DIP, THEN STAYING COMFORTABLY SEASONAL

Following Monday's storm and rain threat, expect a more meaningful reduction in temperatures and humidity levels as we move toward midweek. In fact, temperatures Tuesday afternoon will feel a good 10 degrees cooler than those on Monday for many in the province. Temperatures will warm-up a few degrees later in the week, although still remaining more comfortably seasonal.

"The overall pattern for the remainder of July and early August will feature more comfortable temperatures much of the time," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham. "Brief heat is still expected at times, but overall near seasonal temperatures (with the potential for a couple of days that are cooler than seasonal) should dominate the pattern during late July and into early August."

FIRE DANGER RATINGS REMAIN AT 'EXTREME,' FEAR OF MORE LIGHTNING SPARKED FIRES

Spotty rain and increased humidity this past weekend have given a boost to crews fighting forest fires in the northeast, although the threat for lightning still looms with the advancing cold front. As of Monday morning, there were still 55 active fires in the northeast region with 24 considered 'not yet under control.'

Despite the significant spike in the number of forest fires in the northern region this year, officials say there haven't been any reports of lost buildings or structures, which is great news.



Mandatory evacuation orders in the Temagami area issued last week were downgraded to an evacuation alert, although residents could be asked to leave again at any time due to the situation. 

According to the Ministry of Natural Resources, lightning has been the culprit for most of these active fires. 

"Since June 29th, which was the Friday before the Canada Day long weekend, we have recorded over 165,000 lightning strikes across the Ontario," said the MNR in last Thursday's statement.

Several fire bans are also in effect across the region. 

WATCH BELOW: BRUSH FIRE CLOSES HIGHWAY AS IT RACES FOR THE ROAD



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