Country

Please choose your default site

Americas

Europe

News
Wildfires raise concerns about air quality in three provinces, summer storms drench Quebec and the Maritimes, and parts of the Prairies are feeling the heat. This is what you need to know for Thursday, August 14.

Morning Briefing: Coast-to-coast roundup

loading video...

Dalia Ibrahim
Digital Reporter

Thursday, August 14, 2014, 8:14 AM -

Wildfires raise concerns about air quality in three provinces, summer storms drench Quebec and the Maritimes, and parts of the Prairies are feeling the heat. 

Here's a coast-to-coast peek at what's ahead for Thursday. 

Wild fire smoke produces low visibilities and poor air quality over Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories, and British Columbia

Environment Canada issued a special air quality statement for parts of Newfoundland and Labrador Thursday, where smoke from forest fires in the Upper Lake Melville are is creating hazy conditions.


RELATED: Smoke advisories stretch into Metro Vancouver


"Smoke from several forest fires in the Upper Lake Melville area will be carried northward by south to southeasterly winds, which could cause hazy conditions over parts of the Trans Labrador Highway and the mid coast," said the agency. "This smoke could also lead to deteriorating air quality." 

People with respiratory ailments should take precaution if planning outdoor activities Thursday and Friday.

Additionally, wildfires continue to burn throughout parts of British Columbia and the Northwest Territories, where a smoke advisory remains in effect. 

"Smoke concentrations will vary widely as winds and fire behaviour change," the special air quality statement for B.C. reads. "Metro Vancouver has also issued an air quality advisory for Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley regional district because of high concentration of fine particulate matter, primarily due to smoke from fires in Washington." 

People with chronic underlying conditions should postpone strenuous exercise until the advisory is lifted. 

Heavy rainfall targets the Maritimes

A complex and slow moving trough of low pressure approaching Nova Scotia and New Brunswick from New England will bring scattered showers across much of the region Thursday.

"Periods of heavy rain will develop tonight and will become heavy at times on Friday," says EC in a special weather statement issued Thursday morning.

Wednesday through Friday rainfall forecast

Wednesday through Friday rainfall forecast

The agency says there is still some uncertainty with the system's track and intensity, "consequently determining which regions will the receive heaviest rainfall remains extremely difficult at this time." 

At this time, rainfall amounts can range anywhere from 25 to 45 mm. 

Be sure to check back for updates as warnings may be issued. 


SEE ALSO: Don't give up on summer yet, Ontario!


More rain for Quebec

Rainfall warnings continue for parts of Quebec as a nearly stationary low brings periods of heavy rain to parts of the province.

Parts of central and eastern Quebec could see an additional 40 to 60 mm through Friday, says Environment Canada. 

Motorists are advised to use caution on the roads, as localized flooding in low-lying areas is possible.


BEAT THE TRAFFIC: How will your commute be affected? Rely on Beat the Traffic for real-time traffic updates that matter to you. Visit www.beatthetraffic.com and download the app on iTunes or Google Play and get there sooner!


Manitoba and Saskatchewan are feelin' hot, hot, hot! 

Hot and humid conditions will push humidex values in the 40's this afternoon.

Heat warnings are widespread across southern Saskatchewan and southern Manitoba. 

Residents are reminded to drink plenty of liquids especially water throughout the day. 

Watch the video to test your summer drink IQ!

Monarch butterfly populations are in decline -- but there is a simple way you can help them
MUST SEE: Flood rips through Nebraska hospital
'Alien' seen walking on the Moon in NASA image
Swiss passenger train derails after landslide

Leave a Comment

What do you think? Join the conversation.
Default saved
Close

Search Location

Close