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Next system threatens still more snow for Atlantic Canada


Digital writers
theweathernetwork.com

Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 6:42 PM - Freezing rain hung on through the afternoon for parts of northern New Brunswick, while heavy rain cut through the rest of the Maritime provinces. This storm - which left a damaging and icy mark across Ontario and Quebec - is on its way to Newfoundland next, bringing with it a bout of freezing rain through early Wednesday.

While Atlantic Canada gets a brief break between systems through midweek, forecasters are already watching the next spring storm, expected to cut into the region for the week's end and bring another round of heavy rain and snow to many. We take a look at the timing and details, below.


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WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Freezing rain warnings and rainfall warnings in effect
  • Precipitation tapers off for Maritimes overnight Tuesday into Wednesday, lasting longest for the Acadian Peninsula and Cape Breton Island
  • Precipitation moves into Newfoundland overnight, with leading edge of freezing rain spreading southwest to northeast
  • Freezing rain will change to rain as warm air moves in Wednesday
  • Next system moves in late week, with potential for more snow for Maritimes

Watch below: Timing active weather through mid-week



Freezing rain for Newfoundland Wednesday

Overnight Tuesday into Wednesday is when the system will make its debut in Newfoundland, with the potential for a prolonged period of freezing rain likely for the western half of the island, particularly over higher elevations. In the south and southwest, the system will start with freezing rain, but gradually changeover to rain through the early morning hours. 

"Surfaces such as highways, roads, walkways and parking lots may become icy and slippery," says Environment Canada in a freezing rain warning that covers most of the province. "Be prepared to adjust your driving with changing road conditions."


Drive carefully | Winter driving tips


Wednesday and beyond - Round two! Wrap-around and yet another system

The low pressure centre finally makes its way into Atlantic Canada on Wednesday, and that means, while a prolonged drier period is likely for the Maritimes between late Tuesday and Wednesday, you're not out of the woods quite yet. Some light wrap-around snow and rain showers are likely across much of the Maritimes on Wednesday and Wednesday night as the low cruises by overhead. Newfoundland gets the same treatment on Thursday, with wrap-around snow mainly affecting the west coast with onshore flow.

That's not the end of active weather this week, however. A clipper system moving through the Great Lakes early on Thursday is set to head into the Maritimes later in the day or Thursday evening, bringing a swath of mainly rain to Nova Scotia and southern New Brunswick - at least, to start. As the low intensifies over the region Thursday night, it is expected to wrap cold air back into the Maritimes, mainly New Brunswick, and that could mean some significant snowfall for the province. Models are suggesting a widespread 5 cm, with higher amounts - up to 15 cm in some spots - across the north. Nova Scotia and P.E.I. will want to keep an eye on this one.

Watch below: Timing the next one, with more snow for the Maritimes



Forecasters here at The Weather Network will be keeping a close eye on these systems as they move through the area. Stay with us here, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for the latest developments.

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