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Earth's Crust Falls Silent | Earthquake Drought

Current 'earthquake drought' certain not to last, here's why


Tyler Hamilton
Meteorologist

Thursday, June 14, 2018, 11:06 AM - On average, up to twenty magnitude 7.0 earthquakes per year shake the planet, but 2018 is different. It's been over 100 days since a magnitude 7.0 earthquake was picked up by seismograph on this planet. More details:

The map below is rather sparse, because we've recorded just a handful of stronger earthquakes this year:


But, what's more impressive is the streak we're currently on since the last magnitude 7.0 earthquake. February 25th was the last time a powerful earthquake struck the planet, in Papua New Guinea, or 106 days and counting.

TOUR THE PLANET: LONG EARTHQUAKE DROUGHT



There's still a ways to go for the longest gap ever recorded between magnitude 7.0's on the planet – the current record is 189 days back in the 1960's – but it's not just magnitude 7.0's that are lacking in frequency this year. Arguably, the lack of earthquakes above 6.0 is a more impressive feat. In fact by Tuesday, if there's no magnitude 6.0 earthquake (or stronger), it'll be the longest streak since 1982:



So, enjoy this unusually quiet period of tectonic activity, because it most certainty won't last.

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