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Rachel Schoutsen | Outdoors

Canadian liquid gold: So beloved, we'll eat it off a stick


Rachel Schoutsen
Presenter, The Weather Network

Wednesday, March 7, 2018, 10:15 AM - It's commonly known as Canadian liquid gold, and I personally love it so much I'll eat it off an actual stick. Of course I am are talking maple syrup!

And to celebrate the sticky goodness we all love, here's why this season matters most ...

Let the Harvest Begin

Nobody truly knows when the sap will start running, so tap trees early. The first few days can be some of the best days, so DO NOT put off tapping the trees before it's too late!

Early Spring Don't Mean a Thing

Success doesn't really hinge on an early spring, but rather a long one. On warm days, trees send sap to the branches. During cold nights, the sap heads back down to the roots. Sap runs during these temperature swings, and stops once temperatures stay above 0 C.

Constantly Collecting

Maple syrup is a lesson in confusion - depending on the day, the tree, and the mood of the nearest raccoon, there might get a few drops of sap or need to empty the bucket twice per day. It is widely-known that 2016 was a phenomenal season for collecting, with many harvesters seeing too much sap water.

Maple Trees are Ready... but can you spot one?

We all know what a maple leaf looks like, but can you identify one without its leaves? It's no fun to end up with oak sap in the syrup. Plan ahead by marking trees in the summer, or carefully inspect trees before tapping. You don't want to waste anytime on the wrong trees when the right ones are ready!

WATCH BELOW: Granola bars made with powdered CRICKETS



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