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Road Trips of North America: The Bruce Peninsula

Image: Mac Armstrong/Creative Commons

Image: Mac Armstrong/Creative Commons


By Krissy Vann
Presenter, The Weather Network
@KrissyVann
Thursday, May 8, 2014, 6:00 AM

After what seemed like a never-ending winter for motorcycle enthusiasts, the weather is finally cooperating enough to rev the engine and hit the open road. Throughout Canada there are some exceptional riding opportunities with curvaceous roads that wind through mountains, past sparkling lakes and majestic forests. In Ontario there are some stunning rides located in the Bruce Peninsula. 

On this road trip you can explore stunning scenery, historic lighthouses, informative visitor centres and museums. Folks in the Bruce Peninsula are no strangers to welcoming riders on two wheels making this a very motorcycle friendly excursion.

The Route:

You’ll want to allot at least a weekend to do this road trip as there are many stops along the way that you’ll want to park your bike for photos and exploring. Your first destination will be in Port Clark, which is just under 240 kilometers from Toronto and would take around three and a half hours to travel to. 

No matter how much you’re enjoying the open air, pay close attention to changing speed limits. You can quickly put a damper on your road trip by getting a speeding ticket, but most importantly personal safety should be top of mind. Once in Point Clark your first stop will be right off highway 21 at the Port Clark lighthouse.

Point Clark Lighthouse: 

Image: Magnus Manke / Creative Commons

Image: Magnus Manke / Creative Commons

This lighthouse hugs along the shore of Lake Huron and dates back to the mid 1850’s. This limestone tower stands 87 feet tall and gives you an ideal vantage point to climb to the top and photograph your ride. 

From here you’ll take a nice 16 kilometer jaunt through Lake Ridge Road and in about 30 minutes arrive at your next stop, the Kincardine Lighthouse.

Kincardine Lighthouse

Image: Perlgerl / Creative Commons

Image: Perlgerl / Creative Commons

This is the only downtown lighthouse on the Bruce Coast. This red capped 74 foot tower dates back to around 1881. 

From the Kincardine Lighthouse you’ll be just around a 30 minute drive to the Bruce Power Visitors Centre. You’ll just have to hop on the NB county road 23 and take a left on Concession road 4/County road 20.

Bruce Power Visitors Centre

This is one of North America’s largest nuclear power facilities. The visitor centre is open Monday through Friday from 9 am to 4 pm and through the months of July and August also opens on Saturday. 

This is where you can take a break and enjoy a variety of interactive exhibits and displays. After a visit to Bruce Power, your route continues to the Bruce County museum, which will take about 30 minutes. 

Bruce County Museum & Cultural Centre

Learn all about the vast history of Bruce as well as explore fascinating traveling exhibits. After your visit to the museum you’re next stop will be Lions Head Lighthouse. 

You’ll travel on county road 13 for a bit before spending most of your journey on ON-6. The ride time will take just over an hour, but you will be passing through Sauble, so a trip to the beach may be the perfect stop along the way.

Lions Head lighthouse

This lighthouse has quite a history. It was originally built in 1903, but due to the rough weather along Georgian Bay it had to be rebuilt several times. It was eventually replaced with a metal post and a light in 1969. 

It was a group of students who got together in 1983 and built the replica lighthouse that you see today. From the Lions Head lighthouse it is just under a two hour journey along ON-6 to get to Tobermory, which is home to Bruce Peninsula National Park.

Bruce Peninsula National Park Visitors Centre 

Image: Brucegirl / Creative Commons

Image: Brucegirl / Creative Commons

Before exploring Bruce Peninsula Park you should take a trip to the visitor centre to learn all about what awaits you. 

There are a variety of interactive exhibits to check out and some stunning views from the lookout towers and trails.

When to Travel: 

The best time of year to plan your ride is during the summer months. Due to being on the shores of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay the area generally avoids periods of extreme heat due to the moderating effect. Be sure to pack some clothing ideal for layering and a jacket as summer temperatures can still sometimes be quite cool. 

Exercise caution if you choose to do some swimming or boating as in the summer months storms can develop quite quickly. 

Parks Canada warns that during early spring, late fall and especially the winter months weather can be highly variable. Let’s face it though, even the most diehard motorcycle enthusiast doesn’t want to get caught in a snowstorm.

When planning your road trip check ahead for forecast details at The Weather Network. Don’t forget to bring along the Beat the Traffic app available on iTunes and GooglePlay.


BEAT THE TRAFFIC: How will your commute be affected? Rely on Beat the Traffic for real-time traffic updates that matter to you. Visit www.beatthetraffic.com and download the app on iTunes or Google Play and get there sooner!


More by this author
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Road Trip North America- Sea-to-Sky Highway
Road Trip North America- Cabot Trail

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