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Epsilon threatens impacts on Bermuda, has Newfoundland in its sights

Tuesday, October 20th 2020, 5:29 pm - Tropical Storm Epsilon is maintaining a northwestward course over the central Atlantic, with eyes on potential Canadian impact by the weekend.

Epsilon came roaring to life as a tropical storm Monday and is showing signs of further strengthening, prompting tropical storm watches across Bermuda as it pushes northwestward.

On its current forecast track, Epsilon is expected to move closer to Bermuda on Thursday, making its closest approach to the island Thursday night.

EpsilonInfo

According to the U.S. National Hurricane Center, tropical storm conditions are possible for Bermuda by Thursday. Epsilon is forecast to be at hurricane strength by early Wednesday morning. Large swells are expected to persist for the next several days.

"These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions," the NHC warns.

EpsilonTrack

POTENTIAL TO CLIP NEWFOUNDLAND THIS WEEKEND

Epsilon is expected to accelerate as it tracks north through the weekend with eyes on a potential Canadian connection.

"Most likely Epsilon will stay out to sea, but we are closely watching the potential for the storm to clip Newfoundland with some rain and gusty winds on Sunday night," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham.

2020 HURRICANE SEASON CREEPS CLOSER TO MOST ACTIVE ON RECORD

With Epsilon, the 26th named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, this year creeps closer to uncharted territory. The current record for the most active season was set in 2005, which went as far as Zeta, named for the sixth letter in the Greek alphabet after the traditional name list was exhausted. That storm actually developed well after the official hurricane season in late December and lingered a few days into January before finally dissipating.

Delta, the fourth storm to be given a name from the Greek name list this year, already made landfall in Louisiana as a strong Category 2 hurricane earlier this month. It was especially notable, as it roared from a named tropical storm to Category 4 hurricane in less than two days. That made it the fastest strengthening storm since the mid 19th Century. At its peak, it was also the most powerful Greek-named storm on record.

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