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Imelda most serious flood threat for Texas since Hurricane Harvey

Tuesday, September 17th 2019, 8:10 pm - Tropical Storm Imelda formed in the Gulf of Mexico on Tuesday, shortly before making landfall.

While large Hurricane Humberto has been capturing attention, an upstart storm in the Gulf of Mexico took just 51 minutes to go from depression to the the next named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season.

The system forecasters have been watching closely for the past few days continued to develop on Tuesday, prompting U.S. National Hurricane Center officials to deem it a tropical depression, then tropical storm Tuesday afternoon only shortly before it made landfall near Freeport, Texas. Imelda rapidly diminished to back a tropical depression after landfall, but the danger for the storm is just beginning.

WATCH BELOW: FLOODING THREAT FOR TEXAS, LOUISIANA

SEE ALSO: Hurricane Humberto tracks toward Bermuda

Tropical storm warnings were issued before landfall for parts of the central coast of Texas south of Houston, including Galveston, with a focus on potentially-deadly flash flooding. "The primary threat associated is flooding rainfall that is expected over portions of eastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana over the next day or two," says the NHC update.

Flash flood watches are in effect further inland, including the City of Houston, where rainfall amounts are expected to top 400 mm for some before week's end. The U.S. National Weather Service warns rainfall rates of 2 to 3 inches per hour (50 to 75 mm) are expected in heavy downpours.

11RAIN

Houston, unfortunately, is no stranger to major flooding.

2017 LOOK BACK: THE DEVASTATION OF HURRICANE HARVEY IN THE HOUSTON, TEXAS AREA

"In September 2017, major Hurricane Harvey brought 1500 mm of rain, devastating many parts of the city," Whittal says. "Hurricane Harvey is tied with 2005's Hurricane Katrina as the costliest tropical cyclone on record, primarily from catastrophic rainfall-triggered flooding in the Houston metropolitan area and Southeast Texas."

Where the rain isn't as intense, officials say it will be beneficial to the state after severe drought conditions that developed this summer. As of September 10, just over half of Texas was experiencing drought.

WATCH BELOW: TRACKING MAJOR HURRICANE HUMBERTO

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