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September 28, 2019 - Early Fall And Alberta Was Already Buried

Monday, September 28th 2020, 6:00 am - The City of Calgary set a new all-time September daily snowfall record on Sunday, Sept. 29 with 24.6 cm recorded, beating out the previous record of 22.9 cm set on Sept. 19, 1985.

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In September 2019, an Arctic boundary filtered cold air into the Prairies, setting the stage for several days of heavy snow and dangerous blizzard-like conditions, thanks to a low-pressure system, to southern Alberta and Saskatchewan. The winter-like weather began Saturday, Sept. 28 and continued for two days.

Snowfall and winter storm warnings were issued across both regions, including the City of Calgary, which set a new all-time September daily snowfall record on Sunday, Sept. 29 with 24.6 cm, beating out the previous record of 22.9 cm set on Sept. 19, 1985.

The event was covered by Weather Network’s Kyle Britain, who was reporting near the foothills, where the near 100 cm covered Waterton Lakes National Park. As well as terrible travel conditions, flight cancellations and mass power outages, there was a lot of tree damage in areas where those affected remember this storm as a historic early autumn storm.

On today's podcast, Chris Mei talks about the early blast of winter during the start of fall, how it happened and why it was so severe.

"This Day In Weather History” is a daily podcast by The Weather Network that features unique and informative stories from host Chris Mei.

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