Your weather when it really mattersTM

Country

Please choose your default site

Americas

Asia - Pacific

Europe

November 24, 2014 - Damaging wind leaves tens of thousands in the dark

Tuesday, November 24th 2020, 6:00 am - At the height of the Nov. 24 wind storm, approximately 87,000 customers were in the dark across Ontario, according to Hydro One.

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Amazon Alexa | Google Assistant | Spotify | Google Podcasts | iHeartRadio | Overcast

On Nov. 24, 2014, strong winds downed a number of trees and cut power to thousands of people across much of southern Ontario. A wind warning was issued for Toronto and the surrounding region earlier in the day. "Very strong southwesterly winds" were forecast from Environment Canada, and they were gusting near 100 km/h through much of southern Ontario.

Nov. 24, 2014 wind storm The Nov. 24 wind storm caused some damage to buildings, including roof shingles and windows, while loose objects were tossed by the wind and hydro poles were downed, creating the risk of injury or further damage.

Toronto and the GTA were also under a special weather statement calling for 15-30 mm of rain in some areas. With heavy rain in the forecast, there was the potential for localized flooding in Toronto and many surrounding regions in southern Ontario, beginning on the night of Nov. 23 and lingering into the morning of the 24th.

At the height of the wind storm, Toronto Hydro said approximately 10,000 customers were without power in the west and north end of the city. Across the province, approximately 87,000 customers were in the dark, according to Hydro One. In Quebec, 53,600 Hydro-Quebec customers were without power in various parts of the province on Tuesday, Nov. 25.

Nov. 24, 2014 flood With heavy rain also in the forecast, there was the potential for localized flooding in Toronto and many surrounding regions in southern Ontario, beginning on the night of Nov. 23 and lingering into the morning of the 24th.

In Toronto, police temporarily closed a number of roads. A section of Lakeshore Boulevard was shut down due to flying debris, with trees strewn across roads and a GO Transit train delayed by live wires on the tracks. There was also some damage to buildings, including roof shingles and windows, while loose objects were tossed by the wind and hydro poles were downed, creating the risk of injury or further damage.

On today's podcast, Chris Mei talks about the Nov. 23 wind storm, what was forecast for the day and its impact to the infrastructure, leading to widespread power outages and damage.

This Day In Weather History is a daily podcast by The Weather Network that features unique and informative stories from host Chris Mei.

Default saved
Close

Search Location

Close

Sign In

Please sign in to use this feature.