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It reached - 60 °C during 'Worst Storm in Canadian Railroad History'

Monday, February 8th 2021, 6:00 am - Transporation Saskatchewan came to a halt.

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Thursday, Jan. 30, 1947, was the first day of a 10-day blizzard that hit the south of Saskatchewan. And not just your average 10-day winter storm, the "Worst Storm in Canadian Railroad History" according to Environment Canada.

The entire province was essentially forced to shut down.

 Courtesy: Saskatchewan Archives Board Courtesy of Saskatchewan Archives Board

The storm wrapped up on Feb. 8, but it concocted some unbelievable conditions during its stay.

On Feb. 3, Regina set a North American record with the ridiculous temperature of - 60 °C.

Harold Orr -Saskatchewan blizzard of 1947 Photo from Saskatchewan Archives Board Harold Orr -Saskatchewan blizzard of 1947. Courtesy of Saskatchewan Archives Board

All highways that led in and out of Regina were closed for 10 days. Some roads remained closed until the spring.

Railway transportation had to cease operations for weeks. Crews had to shovel several metres of snow just to find the tracks.

Photo of C.N.R. train buried by 1947  Courtesy: Saskatchewan Archives Board Courtesy of Saskatchewan Archives Board

Ground transportation in and out of Saskatchewan came to a halt.

This of course caused supply issues. Between the snow and the cold, it was almost impossible to get deliveries or to go out for home essentials, like food and coal.

Photo of C.N.R. train buried by 1947  Photo of C.N.R. train buried by 1947. Courtesy of Saskatchewan Archives Board

A hundred carloads of coal were stranded in Regina. People tried to travel on a sleigh to get to trains that were loaded with goods, but their mode of transportation could not hold up against the wind.

Farmers had trouble feeding their animals. Butchers ran out of their meat supply. Butter and yeast were also sold out. People had to get creative with baking.

Schools had no fuel and were forced to close. Homes and businesses reduced their heat consumption as municipal power plants rationed electricity with "dim-outs."

We think Environment Canada got it right when saying "Worst Storm in Canadian Railroad History."

To hear more about this record-breaking storm, listen to today's episode of "This Day In Weather History."

This Day In Weather History is a daily podcast by The Weather Network that features unique and informative stories from host Chris Mei.

Thumbnail photo of C.N.R. train buried by 1947 snowstorm near Weyburn, SK. Courtesy of Saskatchewan Archives Board

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