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August 14, 1975 - A 'One-In-20,000 Year' Rainfall

Friday, August 14th 2020, 7:00 am - On Aug. 14, 1975, London, England's reputation of having a dreary climate with little rain was put aside after a once-in-a-20,000-year flooding event left one person dead and hundreds without homes.

TDiWH - Aug 14 (2) London, England was hit by a once-in-a-20,000-year flooding event.

London, England is usually known for its long periods of overcast skies, light precipitation and cool temperatures, thanks to the city's climate being shaped by the onshore flow of the Atlantic Ocean, this particular August day was extremely wet, and damaging.

On Aug. 14, 1975, London’s weather was a stark contrast to that reputation. Temperatures reached 30°C that afternoon, accompanied by an impactful storm that produced so much rain within three hours, it was considered a once-in-20,000-year event. The resulting floods left one person dead and 250 homeless.


Click here to see more episodes of This Day in Weather History


On today’s podcast (linked aboved), Chris Mei explains why the storm moved so slowly, how much rain actually fell and how meteorologists came up with the summation for the event.

This Day In Weather History is a daily podcast by The Weather Network that features unique and informative stories from host Chris Mei. Click here to listen and subscribe!

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