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Teddy brings heavy rain across Atlantic Canada, strong winds continue

Wednesday, September 23rd 2020, 8:11 pm - Teddy is post-tropical, but with plenty of strength still. People in the region should brace for continuing strong winds, high waves, and pounding rains.

Once a Category 3 hurricane, Teddy made landfall in eastern Nova Scotia as a post-tropical storm. Heavy rainfall will continue in the Maritimes and Newfoundland through Thursday, with many regions expected to see 30-50 mm. Details and timing, below.


PHOTOS: Teddy brings massive waves to Atlantic Canada


STRONG WINDS, HEAVY RAIN CONTINUE

Teddy made landfall on Wednesday morning near Ecum Secum in eastern Nova Scotia and brought high waves, torrential rains, and strong winds in the 60-80 km/h range, with a gust of 85 km/h recorded in Halifax.

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Teddy has exited the Maritimes and is tracking across the Gulf of St. Lawence into Newfoundland. Many regions in Nova Scotia will see 30-60 mm of rain through Thursday, with areas near and north of Sheet Harbour having the potential for over 75 mm.

Most of southern Newfoundland will also see heavy rain between 30-50 mm. The strong wind gusts that the island saw on Wednesday will weaken throughout Thursday morning.

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RELATED: What is a hurricane storm surge, and why is it so dangerous?

The last landfalling tropical system in Atlantic Canada was last year's Dorian, which made landfall in Nova Scotia as a Category 1-equivalent extratropical storm on September 7th, and later on made a second landfall in Newfoundland.

WATCH BELOW: WINDS, WAVES, AND RAIN, TEDDY'S IMPACT FELT ACROSS NOVA SCOTIA

KEEPING THE POWER ON IN NOVA SCOTIA

With Nova Scotia's forests in full-leaf, there was a greater possibly of branches or trees being downed by the storm's strong winds. At one point, around 16,000 Nova Scotia Power customers were in the dark overnight, though the utility's chief operations officer, Mark Sidebottom, told CBC some 300 crews had been successful in restoring power.

The number of outages fluctuated wildly through most of the morning, at one point topping 20,000 once again.

The storm has resulted in multiple closures in Nova Scotia, as well as some delays to ferrys and some parts of public transit. In Prince Edward Island, classes have been cancelled at the Public Schools Branch and French Language School Board. The Confederation Bridge has been closed to high-sided vehicles.

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