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Major winter storm eyes Newfoundland with treacherous blizzard setup

Monday, March 1st 2021, 7:50 pm - After marching through the Maritimes Monday, a vigorous winter storm will barrel through Newfoundland Tuesday with blizzard conditions and heavy snow.

March certainly started off like a lion in Atlantic Canada, with a powerful winter storm that delivered strong winds, heavy snow, and rain across the Maritimes, prompting widespread winter warnings throughout the region. The storm's impacts will be waning in Maritimes by Tuesday morning, but in behind it will be some frigid temperatures and wind chills, along with intense winds. During this time, the storm will be in full force in Newfoundland. Parts of the island could see 20-35 cm of snow, and coupled with howling winds, this will make for dangerous blizzard conditions. Wind gusts may hit as high as 140 km/h in the Wreckhouse region, which will make for treacherous travel in areas of heavy, blowing snow. More details and timing, below.


WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Snow continues Tuesday with possible blizzard conditions, intense wind gusts
  • 20-35 cm of snow in western, northern Newfoundland
  • Temperatures take a nosedive in Maritimes, winds remain strong
  • More wintry weather mid-week

TUESDAY: MARITIMES CHILL, DANGEROUS BLIZZARD CONDITIONS ACROSS NEWFOUNDLAND

The potent storm that powered through the Maritimes to kick-start March did so with intense winds, heavy snow and rain, and will set its sights on Newfoundland for Tuesday. Snow will ease off in northern New Brunswick, P.E.I. early in the morning hours, but the worst of it impacts will have moved out.

The snowfall will continue to move through the island Tuesday. There may be a transition to a rain/snow mix at times in the morning for southern areas including the Burin and Avalon Peninsulas.


Visit our Complete Guide to Spring 2021 for tips to plan for everything ahead!


ATLSnow

The Maritimes and Newfoundland will continue to experience gusty conditions Tuesday, with widespread gusts of 60-70 km/h for the former and 80-100+ km/h for the latter.

The howling in Newfoundland through Tuesday, with blizzard-like conditions that are likely to bring treacherous travel as the heavy snow piles up. A widespread 10-20 cm of snow is expected for the island, with 20-35 cm of snow for western and northern sections.

ATLGustsAM

"Travel is expected to be hazardous due to reduced visibility," Environment Canada warns. "Visibility will be suddenly reduced to near zero at times in heavy snow and blowing snow."

The Wreckhouse region will experience powerful winds that could gust up to 140 km/h overnight into Tuesday morning. Winds will then shift to strong westerlies gusting to 80 km/h.

NLDangerZone

"Be prepared to adjust your driving with changing road conditions," says Environment Canada in the warning. "Rapidly accumulating snow will make travel difficult."

While the precipitation will be gone for most of the Maritimes Tuesday, they will be contending with a drastic temperature drop -- from the low single digits in some areas to the minus double digits for most. The wind chills will be bitter, making it feel close to, at or above -20 across the Maritimes.

ATLChill2

Eastern Nova Scotia will continue to be brushed by sea-effect snow throughout Tuesday once system departs the region, with gusty winds continuing on Wednesday in Newfoundland and lingering snow showers across the island as well.

TEMPERATURES SWING COULD LEAD TO ICY MESS IN ATLANTIC CANADA

LOOK AHEAD: ACTIVE STORM TRACK BRINGS ANOTHER WINTRY SYSTEM MID-WEEK

Beyond Monday's system, a relatively strong clipper will slowly strengthen as it tracks into the region Wednesday night and Thursday.

It is expected to bring 5-10 cm of snow to parts of the central Maritimes including Moncton and Charlottetown, and 5-15 cm for much of Newfoundland, but the snow could change to rain for the Avalon. Rain is anticipated for southern Nova Scotia.

Be sure to check back for the latest updates on the active weather pattern persisting across Atlantic Canada.

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