Your weather when it really mattersTM

Country

Please choose your default site

Americas

Asia - Pacific

Europe

A third US beach-goer contracts flesh-eating disease

Wednesday, July 17th 2019, 2:09 pm - A Virginia woman is recovering from flesh-eating disease, which she is believed to have contracted after going for a quick swim in Norfolk County.

Amanda Edwards tells CNN she was only in the water for about 10 minutes.

The next day, she didn't feel well.

"I noticed this thing that came on my leg. And I was just -- I ignored it for a couple days and it just started getting bigger and bigger and bigger to the point where I couldn`t walk anymore," she told the news outlet.

Doctors treated her infection, which likely entered her leg through a cut.

There was a swimming advisory in place at the time Edwards went swimming.

So far, there have been at least three documented cases of flesh-eating disease infections contracted on U.S. beaches this summer.

INFECTIONS STILL RARE

While flesh-eating infections are rare, officials say beach-goers and people near bodies of water still need to be cautious.

People with open wounds or compromised immune systems should never swim in salt or brackish water, especially when flesh-eating bacteria has been confirmed in the area. Norfolk Health Department says it's best for all people to avoid shallow water or swimming after heavy rain.

On land, infections can occur from eating raw or undercooked seafood -- especially shellfish.

If you discover a wound after spending time near water that is possibly infected, shower with warm soap and water as soon as possible, while paying special attention to wounded areas.

If you develop flu-like symptoms shortly after visiting the beach, seek immediate medical care. The flesh-eating disease can become serious 12-24 hours post-infection.

VIDEO: FLORIDA WOMAN DIES AFTER CONTRACTING FLESH-EASTING DISEASE

Default saved
Close

Search Location

Close

Sign In

Please sign in to use this feature.