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Multiple school-aged students struck by lightning during soccer game

Thursday, September 19th 2019, 12:22 pm - Multiple school-aged soccer players were taken to hospital following a lightning strike during a tournament on Monday in Kingston, Jamaica.

Multiple school-aged soccer players were struck by lightning strike during a tournament on Monday in Kingston, Jamaica, according to local media.

Two players were taken to the hospital.

According to the Jamaica Observer, Jamaica College and Wolmer’s Boys’ School were on the field when several players collapsed during the final 10 minutes of the game.

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One student was initially not able to speak or move the left side of his body but has since regained movement and the ability to speak according to the Inter-Secondary Schools Sports Association (ISSA). The other player who was taken to hospital was assessed and released.

On Tuesday, ISSA canceled another match due to lightning.

LIGHTNING STATS IN CANADA

Canada averages over 2 million lightning strikes a year, according to the Government of Canada.

Between 9 and 10 people are killed and 100 -150 people are injured each year by lightning in the country, compared to an average of 57 deaths annually in the United States.

INDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY TIPS

Stay away from windows. Unplug appliances. Do not use the telephone. Avoid running tap water.

OUTDOOR LIGHTNING SAFETY TIPS

Try to reach a safe building or vehicle (picnic shelters, dugouts, and sheds are NOT safe). Avoid high ground, water, tall, isolated trees and metal objects such as fences or bleachers. If you are out on the water, get to land and find shelter immediately.

IF SOMEONE IS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING

Call for help/dial 911. The injured person has received an electrical shock and may be burned or have other injuries. People who have been struck by lightning do not retain an electrical charge and can be handled safely. Give first aid. If the heart has stopped beating, a trained person should give CPR. Officials offer a 30-30 rule as well. They say if you can count 30 seconds or less between seeing a lightning flash and hearing the thunder, take shelter and stay there until 30 minutes after you last hear thunder.

Safety tips source: Red Cross

VIDEO: DIFFERENT TYPES OF LIGHTNING

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