Your weather when it really mattersTM

Country

Please choose your default site

Americas

Asia - Pacific

Europe

Ancient 2,000-year-old cat geoglyph uncovered in Peru desert

Tuesday, October 20th 2020, 2:27 pm - The 37-metre feline geoglyph dates back to the late-Paracas era, originating from 500 BC to 200 AD.

Thirty-seven metres is an awfully big cat, even for a drawing.

That's exactly the size of a depicted feline that was recently uncovered in the Nazca desert in southern Peru. The ancient 2,000-year-old geoglyph measures 37 metres (121 feet) in length and wasn't found until maintenance work was being done on the Natural Viewpoint, a popular observation platform for tourists.

The pre-historic drawing is part of the Nazca Lines -- a group of mysterious artworks that are imprinted onto a plain 400 kilometres south of Lima, Peru. The feline geoglyph dates back to the late-Paracas era, originating from 500 BC to 200 AD.

In a press release, Peru's culture ministry said (translated): "The figure was scarcely visible and was about to disappear, because it's situated on quite a steep slope that's prone to the effects of natural erosion."

Cat geoglyph Peru The pre-historic drawing is part of the Nazca Lines -- a group of mysterious artworks that are imprinted onto a plain 400 kilometres south of Lima, Peru. Photo: Peru Communication and Image Office/Ministry of Culture.

It is believed by scientists that the cat, very similar to other Nazca animal figures, was designed by making depressions in the desert floor, leaving a coloured earth open. The animal was drawn in a looser, circular style, opposite to most typical geometric drawings that comprise the Nazca Lines.

The feline is now part a vast collection of zoomorphic drawings that have been uncovered across the region's landscape in the last 100 years, including geoglyphs of a hummingbird, a monkey and a pelican.

Source: BBC

Thumbnail courtesy of Peru Communication and Image Office/Ministry of Culture.

Default saved
Close

Search Location

Close

Sign In

Please sign in to use this feature.