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Workers battle 'fatberg' the size of a Boeing 747 under London (YUCK!)

(Thames Water)

(Thames Water)

Dalia Ibrahim
Digital Reporter

Monday, September 1, 2014, 6:19 PM -

Hope you're not eating dinner...

Utility company Thames Water has released a set of downright disgusting pictures of a "fatberg" that took one week to remove from a West London sewer. 

The blockage -- a congealed mass of fat, wet wipes and other litter wrongly put down drains and toilets – formed under a 80 metre stretch of Shepherd’s Bush Road, said the company in a media release Monday.

RELATED: Bus-sized "fatberg" found in suburban London sewer!

The water authority claims it was the size of a Boeing 747, if it was buried underground. 

"A team of sewer experts from the company fought the ‘berg all last week (Tues Aug 26 – Friday August 29)," said Thames Water. "The immense, solid blockage needed to be broken up and removed from the sewer to prevent sewer flooding to nearby homes and business." 

Dave Dennis, Thames Water sewer operations manager says wet wipes are a particular problem in sewers.

SEE ALSO: It’s greener to give up burgers than your car

“Wet wipes cling to the fat. Fat clings to the wipes. And pretty soon your fatberg is out of control and sewage is backing up into roads, gardens and in the worst cases flooding up through toilets and into homes," he said in the press release. “We’ve found all sorts in this sewer – from tennis balls to planks of wood. It goes without saying they shouldn’t be in those pipes. London – bin it, don’t block it.” 

Wipes are usually labelled as "disposable" but, clearly, that is turning out not to be true.

But this isn’t London’s worst offender. Top of the fatberg league is Harrow, with a staggering 13,417 blockages reported in the last five years. Shepherd’s Bush trails behind with just 68.

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