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See 10 years of weather in 3 minutes; NOAA retires GOES-12 after decade of service


Digital writers
theweathernetwork.com

Sunday, August 25, 2013, 12:39 PM -

From hurricane Katrina in 2005 to the crippling Central United States Christmas blizzards of 2009 -- the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 12 has seen it all. 

But after 10 years -- that's 3,788 days -- of recording major weather patterns of the United States East Coast, NOAA has revealed that it will be retiring the coveted satellite. 

“The launch of the GOES 8-12 series, ending with GOES 12, marked a significant advancement in geosynchronous weather monitoring." said Andre Dress, who was the mission operations engineering lead at the time of launch. Dress worked on the GOES I through M series from 1992 to 2001. "It was the transition from the old spinners to a spacecraft that could continuously stare at the earth. It literally changed the game for weather prediction and provided a service that exceeded our wildest dreams. I am proud to have been part of the great team that built, launched, and operated these spacecraft."

Dress is now the Deputy Project Manager for the JPSS mission at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

To honor the decommissioning of the weather satellite, NOAA has created an incredible time-lapse video of all the weather events GOES-12 witness in the last decade.

While GOES-12 is now silent, GOES-13, which serves as the GOES East satellite for the U.S. and GOES-15, which covers the West Coast, are both hovering 35,888 kilometres above the equator. Another back-up satellite, GOES-14, can be put into gear if the others fail.   

With files from NASA/NOAA/Rob Gutro NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

GOES-12 captured this visible image of Hurricane Katrina on August 28, 2005. At that time, the storm was at Category 5 strength (NOAA)

GOES-12 captured this visible image of Hurricane Katrina on August 28, 2005. At that time, the storm was at Category 5 strength (NOAA)

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