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Mud-pack makeover for Taj Mahal

Image: Ekabhishek / Wikimedia Commons

Image: Ekabhishek / Wikimedia Commons

Daniel Martins
Digital Reporter

Sunday, June 8, 2014, 12:56 PM -


Probably the most iconic symbol of India, the Taj Mahal is in need of a makeover.

That's according to archaeology officials in charge of safeguarding the 17th Century structure, built in 1653 by a Mughal emperor as a mausoleum for one of his wives.

The monument is made of white marble, which is pleasing to the eye, but at the time it was built, its architects didn't have to contend with modern-day levels of pollution. 

The BBC reports that pollution from the city of Agra, and a nearby oil refinery, has left yellow stains on the once-pristine marble. 

The mud is supposed to help restore some of that lustre, and it's a 2 mm thick layer of lime-rich clay, according to the BBC. They know it works, because it's apparently been done three times before, the last time in 2008.

That effort lasted six months and cost around $24,000, but don't worry about missing out on the view if you're travelling there soon. Indian officials told the BBC they'll do a few small sections at a time to make sure tourism visits don't suffer.


BUILT TO LAST? Some things endure forever. Others, like the dock that dumped a wedding party into the drink when it collapsed? Not so much. See the crazy video below.

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