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Four things you need to know about Friday's weather

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Daniel Martins
Digital Reporter

Friday, June 6, 2014, 7:40 -

We're nicely into June, and the official start of summer is only around a couple of weeks away.

But, incredibly, today's coast-to-coast weather round-up does in fact include snow for some Canadians (and, less horribly, rain and thunderstorms).

Here are four weather stories to look out for today.

Atlantic Canada's in for a soaking

More rain on the way for the Maritime provinces on Friday, with up to 45 mm falling on parts of New Brunswick by Saturday, with lesser amounts elsewhere in the region.

There are currently no rainfall warnings or watches in effect, but in Newfoundland, a special weather statement covers the southern part of the province.

The island is in the path of what Environment Canada warns could be at-times heavy rainfall through the day Friday into the night.

It's expected to be heaviest on the south coast from Burgeo to Cape Race.


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Not a pretty forecast for folks hoping to soak up the rays, especially after Thursday, which saw several records broken as the temperatures climbed into the mid-20s.

Pleasant weekend on the way for Quebec and Ontario

As it happens, most of the Atlantic provinces were warmer than Quebec and Ontario on Thursday.

For the most part, temperatures in the latter two provinces didn't quite make it past 20C in most places, though most people would have found them just toasty enough.

Around the Golden Horseshoe, no temperature records were broken, but the heat would have been pleasant all the same.

And heading through the weekend, there's good news: Sun and scattered cloud will be the norm through much of the region, with forecast highs into the 20s.

We'll keep you posted on when the weather is expected to turn active once again.

Prairie snows ...

It's not uncommon to see the occasional snowfall warning this late in the season in Canada (after all, a good chunk of our territory is north of 60), but this week, the flakes are drifting uncomfortably south.

Parts of northern Manitoba are in for 30 cm or more through Saturday, falling heaviest around the Hudson Bay shore, including Churchill.

Those areas were under snowfall warnings as Friday dawned, as was a part of northeastern Saskatchewan, although that warning did drop.

Environment Canada says the snow in the warned areas will last to early Saturday afternoon before tapering off as the system weakens and moves into Hudson Bay. Although the agency predicts a mix of snow and ice pellets in some areas, including Churchill, there is some good news for those worried about whether the snow on the ground will last.

"With temperatures near zero, final snowfall accumulations may be a bit less in some areas due to melting of snow on contact with the ground," Environment Canada forecasters say.

...And Prairie storms

Parts of the southern Prairies were downright hot on Thursday.

While there is a cooldown in the cards for Friday, beginning in Alberta and spreading east, it's expected to be followed by a warm-up heading into the weekend. That warmth could be the fuel for thunderstorms, with Friday's risk centred on northern and central Alberta and the foothills.

On Saturday, the risk of non-severe thunderstorms will be much more widespread, covering most of Alberta and stretching well into southern Saskatchewan.

Tune in to the Weather Network on TV for regular updates on our country's weather going into the weekend, and check back for more on our website.


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