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Extreme record breaking temperatures across Canada


Paulina Keber
Staff Writer

Monday, July 15, 2013, 12:02 PM -

For some across the country the weather has been unbearably hot, while for others it’s been too cold to call it summer. But what about some areas that see both at the same time? Let’s take a look at some of the extreme high and low temperatures that people are experiencing across the country. 

Record breaking temperatures were recorded in Newfoundland on Sunday. In fact, Cape Race, NL, hasn’t seen temperatures exceed 25°C since 1963. The map below shows some of the other records to fall in Newfoundland this past weekend.

Looking to New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, both provinces broke record highs. Most impressive is Kouchibouguac, NB, where the previous record was eclipsed by 3.4 degrees, reaching over 35°C. As for Charlottetown, NB, it has not seen temperatures this high for over 70 years.

Meanwhile on the opposite side of the country, weather records are also part of the conversation, but not because of the heat. Some parts of western Canada are hitting record lows. Below are maps of both British Columbia and Alberta. The coolest temperatures in the region come from Muncho Lake, BC, with a record low of 0.7°C. There isn’t much improvement in Alberta, with temperatures dipping as low as 1.9°C in Crowsnest Pass.


But there isn’t just a contrast in temperatures from Western and Eastern parts of the country. There are also sharp highs and lows provincially. Take, for example, Sunday’s weather in Ontario. Towards the north, temperatures dipped to around 6.7°C while southern Ontario saw temperatures closer to 32°C.

The same pattern can be seen in British Columbia. Shockingly, the gap in temperature from Tatlayoko to Penticton was about 30.2°C!

As the summer moves on with the extreme temperatures in a lot of areas, check back and we’ll show you where those highs are being offset with some equally as extreme lows.

St. John's, Newfoundland hits 30°C for the first time in 17 years
Getting dangerously hot in parts of Ontario, Quebec

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