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Beautiful dew-collection tower could help resolve water crisis in Africa


Cheryl Santa Maria
Digital Reporter

Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 6:28 -

More than 700 million people around the world do not have access to clean drinking water, leading to approximately 30,000 deaths each week.

This problem is particularly pronounced in parts of Africa, where, according to charitywater.org, people collectively spend 40 billion hours a year walking to collect water, which often turns out to be contaminated.


RELATED: Incredible 'Jenga' hotel made from recycled shipping containers


The WarkaWater project hopes to alleviate this burden, at least in part, in Ethiopia's mountainous regions.

Designed by Architecture and Vision, WarkaWater is a collection of 9 metre-tall woven bamboo structures that resemble the country's endangered warka trees.

The 'trees' are lined with a special fabric that can collect water from the air via condensation.

Water is then funneled into a reservoir at the bottom of the structure.

Architecture and Vision's 88-pound prototype was designed with the help of a computer algorithm, but it could easily be replicated with materials and skills that village residents would have on hand.

According to Treehugger.com, each tree is capable of harvesting up to 100 litres of water per day, providing villagers with extra time to attend school, work and acquire new valuable new skills.

All photos courtesy of Architecture and Vision

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