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Atlantic Canada's Valentine's Day storm bears strong resemblance to UK storm

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Cheryl Santa Maria
Digital Reporter

Friday, February 14, 2014, 5:17 PM -

The storm system currently impacting the U.K.  and the strong storm hitting Atlantic Canada are completely separate -- but they have a thing or two in common, according to Weather Network meteorologist Dayna Vettese.

Take, for example, their shape. 

"The textbook comma shape is something that occurs in very strong mid-latitude storms," she explains.

"Both Atlantic Canada and the U.K. have been taking the brunt of storms this winter. Many of the storms that impact Atlantic Canada then go on to impact the U.K."

Media outlets, including The Weather Network, have been discussing the pineapple express a lot lately.

This weather phenomenon is defined as a continued feed of moisture that originates from the Hawaii area and flows toward the northwest coast of the U.S. and western coast of Canada.

But you may be unfamiliar with the term 'rum runner', which "refers to a similar moisture plume that originates in the eastern Caribbean then flows to western Europe to impact the U.K.," Vettese says. 


RELATED: Two friends make the most of the U.K. floods



On Friday, the UK Met Office has issued a "red" warning for northwest England and western Wales for the first time in more than a year.

Hurricane force wind gusts up to 170 km/h have been reported, bringing down trees and power lines and leaving hundreds of thousands without power.

England has deployed 70% of its fire and rescue workers to help with the floods, the largest dispatch since the second World War.

Meanwhile, it has been a wet and windy Valentine's Day for many Atlantic Canadians. Widespread warnings cover all four provinces as rain, snow and wind continue to lash the region.

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