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Arthur begins to lash the Maritimes

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Daniel Martins
Digital Reporter

Saturday, July 5, 2014, 12:08 PM -


STORM WATCH: Tune in on TV for live coverage of this storm, along with on-the-ground reports from Chris St. Clair and Nathan Coleman. If it's safe to do so, upload YOUR photos and videos here.


Arthur has weakened to a post-tropical storm, but it is packing a real punch in the Maritimes.

The storm made landfall at around 7:30 am ADT near Meteghan and Port Maitland in Nova Scotia, with maximum winds near 110 km/h. Peak wind gusts in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia were clocked in at 113 km/h.

"Arthur has transformed into a still very potent post-tropical storm and will be tracking across Nova Scotia," the Canadian Hurricane Centre says.

Arthur will move into the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence by the evening.

At least one person was reported injured, a man in his 50s or 60s who was hurt when a tree fell on him in Onslow, N.C., according to Chronicle Herald reporter Frances Willick.

Tropical storm and wind warnings cover most of the Maritimes, along with rainfall warnings in New Brunswick.

The winds were already ramping up in coastal communities early Saturday morning, with more than 110,000 customers without power in Nova Scotia and another 100,000 in New Brunswick. At about 12:30 p.m. local time PEI also reported power outages affecting all customers east of Charlottetown and about 30 more communities.

With winds that strong, people in the region were already reporting damage.

Trees were reported down, or almost certain to fall as the day wears on.

Environment Canada says flooding due to storm surge looks unlikely, but the Atlantic Coast of Nova Scotia will see waves of 5 - 7 m along the southwestern shore Saturday morning, and along the eastern shore in the afternoon and evening.

As the storm tracks northeast, New Brunswick is set to receive the heaviest rain, and that province is where the Maritimes' rainfall warnings are located this morning.

As powerful as the storm is, it is much weaker than it was when it struck North Carolina late Thursday.

It was a category 2 storm, with winds gusting up to 160 km/h, and although no injuries or deaths have been reported, around 40,000 people were left without power.


CHECK BACK: We'll have ongoing coverage of Arthur's effects and after effects through the day. Check back to our website later in the day, and see how windy it was in Halifax in the video below.


With all the jargon for tropical storms and hurricanes, what does it all mean?
Arthur storm watch: The Weather Network touches down in Atlantic Canada
Six photos: Hurricane Arthur
Rare province-wide state of emergency declared in Manitoba

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