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As mentioned in a previous article posted on Wednesday, several forecast models are indicating the potential for some snow for British Columbia for the holiday Monday which just so happens to be the Family Day weekend. 

Models are in agreement that a low pressure system will makes its way along the B.C. coast to end the weekend and start next week. During this time, temperatures will begin cold enough at first to see some snowfall accumulation even with the potential for snow in the lower elevations and metro Vancouver area. At this point, nothing is set in stone but it is certainly something to keep an eye on over the weekend. The finer details of the system such as snowfall totals, temperatures and precipitation types will be nailed down over the next couple of days as newer information becomes available.

At this point, a heavier wet snow along the coast mixed with periods of rain could be the outcome with heavier snow occurring the higher up you travel in elevation. Right now it looks like we could start off as snow in the metro area then change over to rain. Areas like Burnaby and points north and east look like they could receive heavy snow. It’s a system to keep an eye on so as you’re making your Family Day weekend plans, keep checking back for updates.

What has the winter been like so far?

It’s has been an active winter across the country whether you’ve experienced ice storms, wild temperature swings, avalanches, fog-mageddon or blizzards. British Columbia has had its fair share of changeable weather this winter. December temperatures averaged out to below normal for portions of the south coast of British Columbia and northern sections.


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In Vancouver, the average daytime high in December is about 6.3°C and December 2013 averaged out to be 4.9°C; just over 1°C below normal. January on average was the same degrees below normal as December. That being said, the December cold was likely more noticeable as we had more consecutive below normal days in Vancouver in December than in January. We also had quite a few more above normal days in Vancouver in January than in December.

December temperature anomalies from 1981-2010 climate normals (from ESRL)

December temperature anomalies from 1981-2010 climate normals (from ESRL)

January temperature anomalies from 1981-2010 climate normals (from ESRL)

January temperature anomalies from 1981-2010 climate normals (from ESRL)

NEXT PAGE: WHAT ABOUT PRECIPITATION?


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Frigid week looms for British Columbia
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