Insider Insights: Articles

Close

Country

Switching the Tires: Winter to Summer

3293 views

By Rachel Schoutsen
Presenter, Beat the Traffic
@RachelBTT
Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 9:22 AM

We know the warmer days are coming. But making the decision to take off your winter tires is still tricky!

With the mood swings of Mother Nature it could be plus 10 one day and a snow storm the next.

The Rubber Council and Transport Canada suggests that winter tires are your best option until temperatures are steadily above 7 degrees Celsius.


BEAT THE TRAFFIC: How will your commute be affected? Rely on Beat the Traffic for real-time traffic updates that matter to you. Visit www.beatthetraffic.com and download the app on iTunes or Google Play and get there sooner!


As we see winter melt away into spring, flooding becomes an issue on our roads. One of the problems is that temperatures still fall below zero at night this time of year. This makes icy conditions common on the morning drives to work. Hence, the winter tires are still needed. And of course, for the all too often “random” snow storm we see some years in April.

Another option is to use each set of tires equally, so one does not wear faster than the other. Using this method you would change every six months.

In a recent test done by The Weather Network at the Skid Control School, winter tires did preform 20 % better in spring slush than the all season.

Even though we do see the benefits of winter tires they are not mandatory across Canada.

Quebec is the only province that makes winter tires a must. Parts of British Columbia also require winter tires or proper chains for your vehicle.

Other countries have adapted strict laws so drivers can see the importance of a winter tire.

Some countries like Czech Republic say drivers must carry snow tires from November 1st to April 1st and use them when necessary or as directed by road signs.

Let us know when you make the switch! And if you made it too early… well share that story too!

More by this author

Leave a Comment

What do you think? Join the conversation.
Default saved
Close

Search Location

POINTCAST

Look up Canadian postal code or US zip code

Close